June 2016 – Vol. 10, Issue 6

In This Issue…
                                                                           

  • L-carnitine may increase HDL, suggests study
  • Could inositol be as important as folic acid for preventing neural tube defects?
  • Vitamin B6 and B2 may lower breast cancer risk
  • CoQ10 + vitamin B3 may lower maximum heart rate in patients with chronic fatigue
  • Biotin deficiency affects brain cortex at the expense of deeper brain regions
  • Folic acid mitigates Alzheimer’s associated inflammation

 

CLINICAL UPDATE – L-carnitine may increase HDL, suggests study
47 patients with confirmed coronary artery disease (defined by at least 50% blockage of a major artery) were divided into two groups – one group received placebo and one group received 1000mg daily of L-carnitine.  After 12 weeks, levels of HDL (high density lipoprotein) cholesterol showed a significant increase.  The activity of the powerful antioxidant SOD (superoxide dismutase) was also correlated with L-carnitine supplementation, leading researchers to conclude that the beneficial effect on lipid profiles from L-carnitine may be due to its antioxidant properties. 
(Lipids in Health in Disease, June 2016)
LINK to ABSTRACT
Effects of L-carnitine supplementation on lipid profiles in patients with coronary artery disease.
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CLINICAL UPDATE – Could inositol be as important as folic acid for preventing neural tube defects?
Previous studies suggest that inositol, a micronutrient that is sometimes referred to as vitamin B8 which holds an important role in intracellular signaling and cellular membrane integrity, prevents spinal and cranial neural tube defects in mice.  As it appears to be safe for use in human pregnancy, pilot studies in Europe suggest that inositol, especially when taken with folic acid, may prevent neural tube defects better than folic acid alone, especially in the case of “folic acid non-responsive” neural tube defects.
(Birth Defects Research, Clinical and Molecular Teratology, June  2016)
LINK to ABSTRACT
Inositol, neural tube closure and the prevention of neural tube defects.

 

 CLINICAL UPDATE – Vitamin B6 and B2 may lower breast cancer risk
In this prospective study, blood levels of vitamin B6, vitamin B2 (riboflavin), vitamin B9 (folate) and vitamin B12 were measured in women for a period of 15 years, in which 276 breast cancer cases were confirmed and then matched to 276 control cases. Higher levels of vitamin B6, which is known to benefit hormonal balance, was linked to lower rates of both estrogen- and progesterone-receptor positive breast cancers, especially in premenopausal women. High blood levels of vitamin B2 was also linked to lower risk of breast cancer in premenopausal women but no link was found for folate, B12 or homocysteine. 
(Journal of Nutrition, June 2016)
LINK to ABSTRACT
 Plasma Riboflavin and Vitamin B-6, but Not Homocysteine, Folate, or Vitamin B-12, Are Inversely Associated with Breast Cancer Risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition-Varese Cohort.

 

CLINICAL UPDATE – CoQ10 + Vitamin B3 may lower maximum heart rate in patients with chronic fatigue
In this randomized controlled double-blind trial, 80 patients with chronic fatigue syndrome were given either placebo or coenzyme Q10 plus NADH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide), a coenzyme form of vitamin B3. Before and after the trial period, each person was evaluated for their maximum heart rate while exercising to exhaustion.  In addition, each person completed an evaluation of physical and cognitive fatigue.  After 8 weeks, the supplemented group showed a decrease in maximum heart rate and also an improvement in self-reported assessment of fatigue compared to those on placebo.(Clinical Nutrition, August 2016)
LINK to ABSTRACT
Effect of coenzyme Q10 plus nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide supplementation on maximum heart rate after exercise testing in chronic fatigue syndrome - A randomized, controlled, double-blind trial.
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CLINICAL UPDATE – Biotin deficiency affects brain cortex at the expense of deeper brain regions
In this interesting animal study, the brains of biotin-deficient rats were compared to brains of biotin-replete rats, after a controlled feeding study that induced biotin deficiency in some of the animals. Researchers found that when biotin intake decreased enough, biotin concentrations in the brain were maintained at the expense of other organs. Within the brain, the cortex – which is responsible for gross motor function and sensory information – maintains biotin at the expense of other, deeper brain regions, such as the hippocampus (inhibition and memory), hypothalamus (hunger, body temperature and hormones), cerebellum (motor control, attention and language) and the striatum (reward system).  In other words, in order to preserve proper neurotransmission in the brain cortex, other areas of the brain were affected by biotin deficiency first.
(Journal of Nutritional Science and Vitaminology, June 2016)
LINK to ABSTRACT
Effects of Biotin Deficiency on Biotinylated Proteins and Biotin-Related Genes in the Rat Brain.
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CLINICAL UPDATE – Folic acid mitigates Alzheimer’s associated inflammation
Patients with newly diagnosed Alzheimer’s Disease (n=162) were randomly assigned to receive either placebo or 1.25 mg per day of folic acid.  After six months, the levels of amyloid beta proteins – the notorious precursor to physiological plaque deposits characteristic of advanced Alzheimers – were lower in the group receiving folic acid as well as TNF-α  (tumor necrosis factor alpha), a cell signaling protein involved in systemic inflammation leading researchers to conclude that “inflammation may play an important role in the interaction between folic acid and Alzheimer’s Disease.
(Mediators of Inflammation, June 2016)
LINK to ABSTRACT
Folic Acid Supplementation Mitigates Alzheimer's Disease by Reducing Inflammation: A Randomized Controlled Trial.
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