May 2016 – Vol. 10, Issue 5

In This Issue…
                                                                           

  • Vitamin D supplementation may reduce thyroid autoimmunity
  • Serum B12 in “normal” range is linked to cognitive dysfunction
  • Vitamin E and omega 3 fatty acids increase expression of genes that fight oxidative stress
  • Selenium and Serine work together improving antioxidant capacity in liver cells
  • B vitamin deficiencies very common in developed countries, says review

 CLINICAL UPDATE – Vitamin D supplementation may reduce thyroid autoimmunity
Forty-nine women who had recently given birth were included in this study – 38 were treated with thyroid hormone due to postpartum thyroiditis and 21 were untreated healthy controls. Each woman was given either 2000IU or 4000IU of vitamin D daily depending on her blood levels of vitamin D at the beginning of the study.  After three months, it was found that higher vitamin D levels correlated to lower antibodies against two thyroid proteins – thyroid peroxidase and thyroglobulin.  In addition, the protective effect of vitamin D was stronger in the women whose levels were initially the lowest. (European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, May 2016)
LINK to ABSTRACT The effect of vitamin D on thyroid autoimmunity in non-lactating women with postpartum thyroiditis.

  

CLINICAL UPDATE – Serum B12 in “normal” range is linked to cognitive dysfunction
Serum levels of vitamin B12 were measured in one hundred patients with mild cognitive impairment.  In addition, physical changes in the area of the brain responsible for converting short-term memory to long-term memory (hippocampus) were evaluated in these patients.  Researchers found that the structural integrity (on a microscopic level) of the brain was lower in patients that had low-normal vitamin B12 levels, even though their serum B12 fell in the “normal” range, suggesting a functional impact of vitamin B12 exists in the presence of “normal” serum levels.
(American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, April 2016)
LINK to ABSTRACT Vitamin B-12 concentration, memory performance, and hippocampal structure in patients with mild cognitive impairment.

 

CLINICAL UPDATE – Vitamin E and omega 3 fatty acids increase expression of genes that fight oxidative stress
In this randomized controlled trial, three groups of people were given the following every day:  (Group 1) 4 grams omega 3 fatty acids and 400IU vitamin E, or (Group 2) omega 3 fatty acids + placebo or (Group 3) placebo + placebo.  After two months, the expression of two genes that regulate inflammation (SIRT1 and PGC1α) and the total antioxidant capacity was significantly increased only in the Group 1 that was taking both omega 3 fatty acids and vitamin E, demonstrating the effect of these supplements in fighting oxidative stress.
(Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Disease, June 2016)
LINK to ABSTRACT
 Beneficial effects of omega-3 and vitamin E coadministration on gene expression of SIRT1 and PGC1α and serum antioxidant enzymes in patients with coronary artery disease.

 

CLINICAL UPDATE – Selenium and Serine work together improving antioxidant capacity in liver cancer cellsIn vitro studies on cancerous liver cells show that when the amino acid serine was added to different concentrations of selenium, the antioxidant effects were amplified.  Specifically, the expression of selenoprotein P and glutathione peroxidase – two very powerful antioxidants that are highly expressed in liver tissue – were increased when serine was combined with selenium compared to selenium alone.
(Biological Trace Element Research, March 2016)
LINK to ABSTRACT The Synergistic Effect of Serine with Selenocompounds on the Expression of SelP and GPx in HepG2 Cells.

 

CLINICAL UPDATE – B vitamin deficiencies very common in developed countries, says review
In this extensive review paper, the role of B-vitamins is explained in metabolic detail, and the authors emphasize that the eight vitamins that make up the B-complex – B1 (thiamine), B2 (riboflavin), B3 (niacin), B5 (pantothenate), B6 (pyridoxine), B7 (biotin), B9 (folate) and B12 (cobalamin) – are typically not evaluated collectively in studies.  In other words, several B vitamins are commonly neglected in vitamin trials. The authors state that “evidence from human research clearly shows that a significant proportion of the population of developed countries suffer from deficiencies or insufficiencies in one or more of this group of vitamins” supporting the notion that a comprehensive nutritional profile is more clinically relevant than measuring nutrients, such as B12, in isolation.
Nutrients, January 2016)
LINK to ABSTRACT
B Vitamins and the Brain: Mechanisms, Dose and Efficacy--A Review.
LINK to FREE FULL TEXT