In This Issue….
                                                                              

-   Multivitamin Debate Continues: Nutrition experts publish rebuttal to “supplements are a  waste of money” assertion
-   Study suggests specific genetic testing should be done prior to testosterone therapy
-   CoQ10 may alleviate hormonally induced brain fog
-   Vitamin D controls testosterone production
-   Can thyroid hormones predict depression severity?
-   Vitamin A deficiency alters circadian rhythms

CLINICAL UPDATE – Multivitamin Debate Continues – Nutrition experts publish rebuttal to “supplements are a waste of money” assertion.

In this month’s Annals of Internal Medicine, an editorial was published regarding the recent paper in the same journal (December 2013) that concluded vitamin and mineral supplements did not aid in the primary prevention of heart disease or cancer. (For more details on the original paper, see February 2014 edition of SpectraCell clinical updates – click here) The editorial, written by Dr. Guallar from the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health and others, stated that “Most supplements do not prevent chronic disease or death, their use is not justified, and they should be avoided.” He goes on to say that “the case is closed” and supplements “have no clear benefits and might even be harmful.”

A scathing rebuttal was published in the Comments and Responses section of the same journal by leading nutrition medical experts Dr. Balz Frei (Linus Pauling Institute), Dr. Bruce Ames (Children’s Hospital Oakland Research Institute), Dr. Jeffrey Blumberg (Tufts University) and Dr. Walter Willett (Harvard School of Public Health). In this rebuttal, they state that “To call the case closed; deny the value of further research; and label multivitamin and mineral supplements useless, harmful, and a waste of money is wrong, is not based on the established science for their primary indication, and misinforms the public and the medical community.”

They and others point to the largest randomized controlled trial of supplements conducted to date, the Physicians Health Study II, that followed 15,000 male physicians for 13 years and found an 8%-12% reduced risk of cancer for those taking a multivitamin. They also point out that conventional randomized controlled trial designs “have limited ability to reveal the benefits of nutrients – in contrast to drugs – for chronic diseases.”
(Annals of Internal Medicine, June 2014)

LINK to FULL TEXT Comments and Responses to “Enough is Enough. Stop wasting money on vitamin and mineral supplements.” (Rebuttal Editorial mentioned above is copywright protected)

CLINICAL UPDATE – Study suggests specific genetic testing should be done prior to testosterone therapy

Recent reports of increased risk for cardiac events for those taking exogenous testosterone may be linked to a person’s genetic propensity toward developing blood clots, suggests a new study. 38 men and 4 women who had experienced a documented thrombotic event after starting testosterone therapy were evaluated. Of the 42 cases, 39 had undiagnosed thrombophilia. The authors stated that before beginning testosterone therapy “at a minimum, measurements should be made for the Factor V Leiden and Prothrombin mutations,” which are genes that increase a person’s tendency to form blood clots (thrombosis).

In an unrelated study, over 9000 men and women who had estrogen and testosterone measured and who were not taking any exogenous hormones were followed for thrombotic events. The researchers found that endogenous hormones were not associated with increased risk deep vein thrombosis.
(Metabolism, May 2014)
(Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis, March 2014)

LINK to ABSTRACT Testosterone therapy, thrombosis, thrombophilia, cardiovascular events.
LINK to ABSTRACT
Endogenous sex hormones and risk of venous thromboembolism in women and men.
LINK to Flyer on Factor V Leiden
LINK to Flyer on Prothrombin
LINK to Flyer on NUTRITIONAL INFLUENCES on TESTOSTERONE

CLINICAL UPDATE – CoQ10 may alleviate hormonally induced brain fog

Administration of the powerful antioxidant coenzyme Q10 after surgically-induced menopause (ovary removal) significantly improved cognition and brain function in this animal study. The activity of protective antioxidant enzymes was significantly reduced after removal of ovaries and subsequent loss of endogenous estrogen. The authors concluded “CoQ10 improves cognitive decline in post-menopausal state by modulating mitochondrial functions and oxidative stress.”
(Neurochemistry International, April 2014)

LINK to ABSTRACT Coenzyme Q10 treatment ameliorates cognitive deficits by modulating mitochondrial functions in surgically induced menopause.
LINK to Flyer on NUTRITIONAL INFLUENCES in ESTROGEN
 
LINK to Flyer on NUTRITIONAL INFLUENCES in COGNITIVE DYSFUNCTION

CLINICAL UPDATE – Vitamin D controls testosterone production

An analysis of sixty-three genes regulated by vitamin D confirmed a link between vitamin D status and testosterone production. Researchers found that vitamin D significantly affects the expression of several genes that control testosterone synthesis in men.
(Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, June 2014)

LINK to ABSTRACT Testicular synthesis and vitamin D action.
LINK to Flyer on NUTRITIONAL INFLUENCES in TESTOSTERONE
      

CLINICAL UPDATE – Can thyroid hormones predict depression severity?

Thyroid hormones in 44 patients were measured and correlated to clinical severity of depression symptoms. Patients with thyroid autoimmunity were excluded. Specifically, thyroid stimulating hormone and free T3 and T4 were measured and the authors found that free thyroid hormones correlated to depression severity. They concluded that thyroid hormone therapies would likely augment pharmacologically treated depression.
(Molecular Biology Reports, April 2014)

LINK to ABSTRACT Thyroid hormones association with depression severity and clinical outcome in patients with major depressive disorder. LINK to FREE FULL TEXT
LINK to Flyer on NUTRITIONAL INFLUENCES in HYPOTHYROIDISM

CLINICAL UPDATE – Vitamin A deficiency alters circadian rhythms

When vitamin A deficiency was induced in this animal experiment, researchers found that the gene expression for normal circadian rhythm was negatively altered. Levels of the antioxidant glutathione were also reduced. This regulatory role of vitamin A in the expression of genes that are associated with circadian rhythms suggests a link between vitamin A to memory and learning, according to the researchers.
(Nutrition Research, April 2014)

LINK to ABSTRACT Circadian rhythms of locomotor activity and hippocampal clock genes expression are dampened in vitamin A-deficient rats.
LINK to Flyer on NUTRITIONAL INFLUENCES in INSOMNIA