October 2013 - Volume 7, Issue 10

In This Issue…


- Low B6 increases risk of depression
- Zinc benefits alopecia
- When given antioxidants, patients voluntarily stopped pain medication
- Vitamin D amplifies benefits of resistance training
- Zinc depletion may cause leaky gut syndrome

CLINICAL UPDATE - Low B6 increases risk of depression

Blood levels of vitamin B6, which is cofactor in the synthesis and function of several neurotransmitters including serotonin, gamma-amino-butyric acid (GABA) and dopamine, were measured in individuals ranging in age from 21 to 67 years old.  After three years, a survey on depressive symptoms was taken and compared to their B6 levels at baseline. The authors concluded that "a higher vitamin B6 status may be associated with a decreased risk of depressive symptoms."
(European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, October 2013)

LINK TO ABSTRACT Serum pyridoxal concentrations and depressive symptoms among Japanese adults: results from a prospective study.
LINK to FLYER on NUTRIENT INTERACTIONS in DEPRESSION

CLINICAL UPDATE - Zinc benefits alopecia

In this case study, thyroxine treatment was given to a 28 year old female to treat hypothyroidism.  Her clinical manifestations of low thyroid - notably thinning hair, but also depression, scaly skin, weakness - did not improve with thyroid treatment so a zinc supplement was added to her thyroid regimen.  After one month, scaly skins lesions had cleared completely and her depression began to lift.  After four months, there was a "complete regrowth of hair," which demonstrates how zinc's role in synthesizing thyroid hormones manifests clinically.
(International Journal of Trichology, January 2013)

LINK TO ABSTRACT Zinc deficieny associated with hypothyroidism: an overlooked cause of severe alopecia.
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LINK to FLYER on NUTRIENT INTERACTIONS in HYPOTHYROIDISM

CLINICAL UPDATE - When given antioxidants, patients voluntarily stopped pain medication
98 adult patients that had chronic lower back pain for over 12 weeks were given 600mg alpha-lipoic acid and 140 IU of the powerful antioxidant superoxide dismutase for 60 days and assessed for pain, back function and use of analgesics.  At the end of the study, only 8% of patients were still using pain meds, compared to 74% of patients at the beginning of the study.  Clinical indicators of pain significantly decreased, and back function improved after about 40 days of the antioxidant treatment.
(European Journal of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine, October 2013)

LINK to ABSTRACT Alpha lipoic acid and superoxide dismutase in the treatment of chronic low back pain.
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LINK to Flyer on NUTRIENT INTERACTIONS in PAIN

CLINICAL UPDATE - Vitamin D amplifies benefits of resistance training
In this double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, 23 overweight adults were given either placebo or 4000IU of vitamin D for 12 weeks.  In the first month, muscle strength only improved in the group taking vitamin D, while no change was seen in the placebo group.  In addition, as vitamin D status improved, waist-to-hip ratio also improved, suggesting a synergistic relationship between exercise and vitamin D.  In a similar study, blood levels of vitamin D were measured on 35 men and women that completed a 12 week resistance training program.  In this study, the authors concluded "a training-induced improvement in glucose tolerance does not offset the negative effect of insufficient vitamin D status."
(Clinical Nutrition, June 2013)
(Nutrition Research, May 2013)

LINK to ABSTRACT Impact of vitamin D supplementation during a resistance training intervention on body composition, muscle function, and glucose intolerance in overweight and obese adults pain. 
LINK to ABSTRACT Vitamin D status and resistance exercise training independently affect glucose tolerance in older adults.
LINK to Flyer on NUTRIENT INTERACTIONS in WEIGHT MANAGEMENT

CLINICAL UPDATE - Zinc depletion may cause leaky gut syndrome
The role of zinc in reducing inflammation is well-documented, but new insight into how zinc benefits gastrointestinal inflammation emerged in a recent study. Researchers found that zinc depletion triggered an increase in inflammatory cytokines in the gut, which ultimately compromised intestinal epithelial integrity (caused leaky gut). The authors state that "the clinical observation that zinc supplements ameliorate Crohn's disease symptoms and decrease intestinal permeability in experimental colitis." Two other studies in the same issue of JNB highlight zinc's role in reducing inflammatory cytokine expression in liver tissue and systemically.
(Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry, June 2013)

LINK to ABSTRACT Intracellular zinc is required for intestinal cell survival signals triggered by the inflammatory cytokine TNFα.
LINK to ABSTRACT Regulation of hepatic suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 by zinc.
LINK to ABSTRACT Inflammation markers predict zinc transporter gene expression in women with type 2 diabetes mellitus.
LINK to Flyer on NUTRIENT INTERACTIONS in INFLAMMATION