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April 2013 - Volume 7, Issue 4

 

In this issue...

-  Research suggests nutrient depletions from commonly prescribed drugs are actually the cause of many side effects
-  Study sheds light on how oleic acid improves immunity
-  Serine for arthritis?
-  CoQ10 shows potential as an anti-depressant
-  When it comes to colorectal cancer risk, cysteine = good, homocysteine = bad

 

                                                                                                                                                 

 

 

 

CLINICAL UPDATE - Research suggests nutrient depletions from commonly prescribed drugs are actually the cause of many side effects

A recently published review details the enzymatic pathways that various drugs interrupt and how certain drugs deplete very specific nutrients. Nutrient depletions are implicated as a cause of common side effects and even non-compliance.  Specifically, the study reviews data and the metabolic pathway- nutrient depletion impact of  five drug classes: 

(1) High blood pressure meds deplete zinc thus causing many of the taste disorders seen in patients on ACE (angiotensin-conversion enzyme) inhibitors or ARAII (angiotensin II receptor antagonist) inhibitors. 

(2) Acetylsalicylic acid meds used as an anti-inflammatorydepletes patients of vitamin C. 

(3) Proton pump inhibitors increase gastrointestinal pH, and thus irreversibly impairs the ability to utilize vitamin B12, vitamin C or iron. 

(4) The diabetic drug metformin causes vitamin B12 depletion in a dose-dependent manner, thus suggesting a cause for side effects such as anemia, neuropathies and hyperhomocysteinemia. 

(5) The mechanism behind statin-associated myopathies due to coenzyme Q10 depletion is discussed. 

(Nutrition, April 2013)
LINK to ABSTRACT  Effects of widely used drugs on micronutrients: A story rarely told.

LINK to FLYER on DRUG-INDUCED NUTRIENT DEPLETIONS

 

 

 

 

CLINICAL UPDATE - STUDY SHEDS LIGHT ON HOW OLEIC ACID IMPROVES IMMUNITY

By affecting compounds released during an immune response, oleic acid quells inflammation and improves overall immunity. Specifically, oleic acid, abundant in olive oil, inhibits the production of several pro-inflammatory substances, such as Interleukin 2 (IL-2), natural killer cells (NK), interferon-gamma (INF-γ) and vascular cell adhesion molecules (VCAM). Oleic acid also reduces the amount of arachidonic acid (AA) present in cells, which in turn minimizes pro-inflammatory cytokine production. 

(Hospital Nutrition, August 2012)

LINK to ABSTRACT Role of oleic acid in immune system - mechanism of action: a review

LINK to FREE FULL TEXT


 

 

CLINICAL UPDATE - SERINE FOR ARTHRITIS

Human cells from rheumatoid arthritis patients were exposed to phosphatidylserine and then evaluated for levels of inflammation.  The phosphatidylserine significantly lowered inflammation levels in vitro.  The same researchers tested phosphatidylserine’s effect on arthritic pain in an animal model and found that phosphatidylserine, which has well-established roles in neurotransmitter function, also decreased arthritic and pain symptoms.

(Nutrition Research, March 2013 2012)

LINK to ABSTRACT Phosphatidylserine inhibits inflammatory responses in interleukin-1β-stimulated fibroblast-like synoviocytes and alleviates carrageenan-induced arthritis in rat.

 

 

 

 

CLINICAL UPDATE - COQ10 SHOWS POTENTIAL AS AN ANTI-DEPRESSANT

Four different doses of CoQ10 were administered for three weeks in an animal study on depression caused by chronic stress.  Depressive behaviours evaluated as were physiological markers of oxidative stress in the brain. Depressive symptoms were decreased and there was a dose-dependent reduction in damaging chemicals in the brain that are linked with depression. The authors concluded “CoQ10 may have a potential therapeutic value for the management of depressive disorders.”

 

(Pharmacology, Biochemistry and Behavior, March 2013)

LINK to ABSTRACT Coenzyme Q10 displays antidepressant-like activity with reduction of hippocampal oxidative/nitrosative DNA damage in chronically stressed rats.

 

 

 

 

CLINICAL UPDATE - WHEN IT COMES TO COLORECTAL CANCER RISK, CYSTEINE = GOOD, HOMOCYSTEINE = BAD

In this clinical trial, levels of the toxic amino acid homocysteine and levels of the beneficial antioxidant cysteine were measured in over 900 women with colorectal cancer and compared to a similar group of over 900 women without cancer.   Those with the highest homocysteine (over 9.85 μmol/L) were 1.5 times more likely to have colorectal cancer than those with the lowest levels (>6.74 μmol/L).  Conversely, women with the highest levels of cysteine in the blood had a much lower risk of colorectal cancer than those with the lowest levels of cysteine.

(American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, April 2013)

LINK to ABSTRACT  Homocysteine, cysteine, and risk of incident colorectal cancer in the Women's Health Initiative observational cohort.