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February 2013 - Volume 7, Issue 2

 

In this issue...

-  Inositol makes fat cells smaller

-  Vitamin A and D reduce breast cancer risk

-  Carnitine touted as a super nutrient for metabolic disorders

-  Deficiencies of mother increase risk of autism in offspring

-  Severity of D deficiency correlates to severity of arthritis

                                                                                                                                                 

 

 

 

CLINICAL UPDATE - Inositol makes fat cells smaller

Part of the B-vitamin complex, inositol has long been investigated for its ability to increase sensitivity to insulin and therefore lower blood sugar and boost metabolism.  In this animal study, myo-inositol was given for 15 days and resulted in improved glucose tolerance and decreased white adipose tissue compared to an untreated group.  The decrease in white adipose tissue (fat) was due to a decrease in the size of the fat cells, vs a decrease in the number of fat cells.  Authors concluded that myo-inositol could be “a viable nutritional strategy for the prevention and/ or treatment of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes.”

(Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry, February 2013)

LINK to ABSTRACT  Chronic treatment with myo-inositol reduces white adipose tissue accretion and improves insulin sensitivity in female mice.

LINK to FLYER on NUTRIENT INTERACTIONS IN DIABETES

LINK to FLYER on NUTRIENT INTERACTIONS IN WEIGHT MANAGEMENT

 

 

 


CLINICAL UPDATE - VITAMIN A AND D REDUCE BREAST CANCER RISK

In a large prospective study, levels of difference carotenoids were measured in the blood of over 3000 women with breast cancer and compared to women with no breast cancer.  For various forms of vitamin A, the results consistently showed that the higher the vitamin A level, the lower the risk of breast cancer, especially for estrogen receptor negative tumors.  In another study on women with newly diagnosed breast cancer, researchers found that vitamin D deficiency was linked to breast cancer and the more severe the deficiency, the stronger the link.

(Journal of the National Cancer Institute, December 2012)

(Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, January 2013)

LINK to ABSTRACT Circulating carotenoids and risk of breast cancer: pooled analysis of eight prospective studies.

LINK to ABSTRACT Association between 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration and breast cancer risk in an Australian population: an observational case-control study.


 



CLINICAL UPDATE - CARNITINE TOUTED AS A SUPER NUTRIENT FOR METABOLIC DISORDERS

In this recently published review on carnitine, its role in preventing mitochondrial dysfunction is thoroughly illustrated. The authors suggest carnitine is appropriate for treatment of conditions linked with inefficient cellular metabolism such as heart failure, insulin resistance, hypertension, vascular dysfunction, dyslipidemia and type 2 diabetes.

(Translational Research, February 2013)

LINK to ABSTRACT Translating the basic knowledge of mitochondrial functions to metabolic therapy: role of L-carnitine.





CLINICAL UPDATE - DEFICIENCIES OF MOTHER INCREASE RISK OF AUTISM IN OFFSPRING

Over 85,000 mother- children pairs were evaluated in this large study on the use of folic acid during pregnancy.  Researchers found that the prevalence of autism in children born to mothers who took folic acid supplements before conception and for at least the first two months of pregnancy was half that for those children born to mothers who did not use folic acid supplements.  In another study, researchers found that children with autism were much more likely to be deficient in folate and vitamin B12 – two key nutrients in the detoxification (methylation) pathways in the brain.

(Journal of the American Medical Association, February 2013)

(Nutrition, March 2013)

LINK to ABSTRACT Association between maternal use of folic acid supplements and risk of autism spectrum disorders in children.

LINK to ABSTRACT Low folate and vitamin B12 nourishment is common in Omani children with newly diagnosed autism.

LINK to FLYER on NUTRIENT INTERACTIONS IN AUTISM






CLINICAL UPDATE - SEVERITY OF D DEFICIENCY CORRELATES TO SEVERITY OF ARTHRITIS

Blood levels of vitamin D were measured in over 300 rheumatoid arthritis patients.  In the patients with severe vitamin D deficiency (defined by less than 15 nmol/l), they had higher use of arthritic drugs, higher c-reactive protein levels (higher inflammation), and their arthritis commenced at a younger age than those with normal vitamin D levels.

(Clinical Rheumatology, January 2013)

LINK to ABSTRACT Severe deficiency of 25-hydroxyvitamin D(3) (25-OH-D (3)) is associated with high disease activity of rheumatoid arthritis.