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October 2012 - Volume 6, Issue 10

 

In this issue...

-  Vitamin D status predicts lesion formation in multiple sclerosis

-  Folate metabolism gene linked with autism

-  Vitamin B6 may prevent breast cancer

-  Carnitine lowers triglycerides

-  MTHFR gene raises risk of diabetic complications

-  Serine can reduce stress hormones

-  New evidence in the case for antioxidant supplements

 

                                                                                                                                                 

 

 

 

CLINICAL UPDATE - VITAMIN d STATUS PREDICTS LESION FORMATION IN MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS

Over 2300 brain scans were done on 469 patients with multiple sclerosis.  Vitamin D levels were also measured at the time of the brain scan.  For each 10ng/mL of higher vitamin D status, there was a 15%-32% lower risk of new lesion formation (depending on type of lesion).  Higher vitamin D status was also associated with lower rates of disability in multiple sclerosis patients.

(Annals of Neurology, August 2012)

LINK to ABSTRACT  Vitamin D status predicts new brain magnetic resonance imaging activity in multiple sclerosis.

 

 

 

CLINICAL UPDATE - FOLATE METABOLISM GENE LINKED WITH AUTISM

Folic acid intake prior to pregnancy was assessed for over 800 women.  Two thirds of the women had children with either autism or developmental delay and one third had children with typical development, according to standardized testing. Researchers found that the women who had a mutation in the MTHFR (methylene tetrahydro folate reductase) gene, which determines the efficiency of folate metabolism, were more likely to have an autistic child. 

(American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, July 2012)

LINK to ABSTRACT Maternal periconceptional folic acid intake and risk of autism spectrum disorders and developmental delay in the CHARGE (CHildhood Autism Risks from Genetics and Environment) case-control study.

 

 

 

 

CLINICAL UPDATE - VITAMIN b6 MAY PREVENT BREAST CANCER

Levels of the active form of vitamin B6 were measured in 706 women with breast cancer.  When compared to a group of over 700 women with similar age and ethnicity who did not develop breast cancer, those in the highest quartile of vitamin B6 concentrations had a 30% reduced risk of invasive breast cancer, suggesting that this, combined with “information from two other prospective studies, suggest a role for vitamin B6 in the prevention of postmenopausal breast cancer.”

(Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention, October 2012)

LINK to ABSTRACT  Prediagnostic Plasma Pyridoxal 5'-Phosphate (Vitamin B6) Levels and Invasive Breast Carcinoma Risk: The Multiethnic Cohort.


 

 

CLINICAL UPDATE - CARNITINE LOWERS TRIGLYCERIDES

In a small study (60 people), the administration of 750 mg per day of the amino acid carnitine (250mg three times daily) for eight weeks to patients undergoing hemodialysis lowered their triglycerides by 10% and low density choleseterol by 9%. 

(Saudi Journal of Kidney Disease and Transplantation, May 2012)

LINK to ABSTRACT Oral carnitine supplementation for dyslipidemia in chronic hemodialysis patients.

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CLINICAL UPDATE - mthfr GENE RAISES RISK OF DIABETIC COMPLICATIONS

Type II diabetics who are carriers of the 677C→T mutation in the MTHFR (methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase) gene have a much higher risk of kidney and eye disease  (nephropathy and retinopathy) than diabetics without this mutation.  Both those homozygous or heterozygous for the gene have increased risk, according to recent studies.

(Diabetes Research in Clinical Practice, January 2012)

(Journal of the Renin-Angiotensin Aldosterone System, May 2012)
LINK to ABSTRACTAn updated meta-analysis of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene 677C/T polymorphism with diabetic nephropathy and diabetic retinopathy.

 LNK to ABSTRACT MTHFR C677T, A1298C and ACE I/D polymorphisms as risk factors for diabetic nephropathy among type 2 diabetic patients.

 

 

CLINICAL UPDATE - SERINE CAN REDUCE STRESS HORMONES

In this study on sixty chronically stressed, but otherwise healthy non-smoking men aged 30 to 60 years old, researchers found that supplementing with phosphatidylserine for 12 weeks seemed to restore a blunted cortisol response which can occur with chronic stress.  They found that the effects of serine were only significant in those who showed a dysfunctional response of the HPA (hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal) axis.  In other words, the benefits of serine occurred only in the very highly/ chronically stressed men, whose cortisol response had been altered by chronic stress.

(Nutrition Research, April 2012)

LINK to ABSTRACT Omega-3 fatty acids administered in phosphatidylserine improved certain aspects of high chronic stress in men.

 

CLINICAL UPDATE - NEW EVIDENCE IN THE CASE FOR ANTIOXIDANT SUPPLEMENTS

A newly published meta-analysis that reviewed 21 randomized, controlled trials on antioxidant supplementation and the critically ill or hospitalized patient, concluded that supplementation benefits patients significantly.  Specifically, those on an antioxidant regimen had lower mortality, they spent less time on ventilators and had fewer infections, although the length of hospital stay did not differ between groups.

(Critical Care, April 2012)

LINK to ABSTRACT Antioxidant micronutrients in the critically ill: a systematic review and meta-analysis.