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August 2012 - Volume 6, Issue 8

 

In this issue...

- Can omega 3 index predict dementia?

- Serine's role in methylation gaining attention

- New evidence shows that B1 deficiency alters brain structure

- D2 or D3: that is the question...

- CoQ10 an effective treatment for male infertility

- Vitamin C and E reduce damage caused by oral contraceptives

 

                                                                                                                                                 

 

 

 

CLINICAL UPDATE - CAN OMEGA 3 INDEX PREDICT DEMENTIA?

When a group of 132 patients (average age of 67) were monitored after recovery from clinical depression, the level of omega 3 fatty acids in their red blood cells (also called omega 3 index) were associated with cognitive function, especially memory.  Researchers concluded that lower omega 3 index “may be good predictors for cognitive impairment in older people.”

(American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, February 2012)

LINK to ABSTRACT  Associations between n-3 PUFA concentrations and cognitive function after recovery from late-life depression.

 

 

 

CLINICAL UPDATE - SERINE'S ROLE IN METHYLATION GAINING ATTENTION

The role of B vitamins, especially B6, B12 and folate in the methylation of proteins and DNA has been understood for years. However, new research on the amino acid serine reveals its role as a very critical methyl donor, leading researchers to conclude that serine may be just as important to proper methylation as B vitamins, especially in case of folate deficiency.  As the role of specific nutrients on gene expression gains attention, some predict that personalized nutrition will become the new norm.

(Journal of Biological Chemistry, June 2012)

(Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry, August 2012)
(Current Opinion in Clinical Nutrition and Metabolic Care, September 2012)

LINK to ABSTRACT Resurgence of serine: an often neglected but indispensable amino acid.

LINK to ABSTRACT Nutrition and epigenetics: an interplay of dietary methyl donors, one-carbon metabolism and DNA methylation.

LINK to ABSTRACT Epigenetics: are there implications for personalized nutrition?

LINK to FLYER ROLE OF NUTRIENTS IN METHYLATION

 

 

 

 

CLINICAL UPDATE - NEW EVIDENCE SHOWS B1 DEFICIENCY ALTERS BRAIN STRUCTURE

Blood levels of thiamine (vitamin B1) were measured in a small group of patients with liver failure, and then compared to their physical brain structure.  Parts of the brain associated with smell, memory and recognition (mammillary bodies) actually shrank as a consequence of B1 deficiency.  The authors suggest that these changes may be reversible upon repletion of vitamin B1.

(Clinical Nutrition, June 2012)

LINK to ABSTRACT  Thiamine deficiency related microstructural brain changes in acute and acute-on-chronic liver failure of non-alcoholic etiology.

 

 

CLINICAL UPDATE - D2 AND D3: THAT IS THE QUESTION...

In a comprehensive review of vitamin D supplementation trials, it was found that “vitamin D3 is more efficacious at raising serum 25(OH)D concentrations than is vitamin D2.”  However, the authors noted that D3 raised blood levels of vitamin D better than D2 when given as a large dose, but stated that “the effect was lost with daily supplementation.”  Interestingly, in another study where 48 patients were given 50,000IU of vitamin D2, the blood levels of D2 rose over 800% while blood levels of D3 decreased by about 50%.  Finally, in a study of over 31,000 people who took vitamin D supplements, it was found that daily supplementation of at least 800IU of vitamin D was needed to improve bone health.

(American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, June 2012)

(Endocrinology Practice, June 2012)

(New England Journal of Medicine, July 2012)

LINK to ABSTRACT Comparison of vitamin D2 and vitamin D3 supplementation in raising serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D status: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

LINK to FREE FULL TEXT

LINK to ABSTRACT Treatment with 50,000 IU vitamin D2 every other week and effect on serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D2, 25-hydroxyvitamin D3, and total 25-hydroxyvitamin D in a clinical setting.

LINK to ABSTRACT A pooled analysis of vitamin D dose requirements for fracture prevention.

 

 

 

 

CLINICAL UPDATE - COQ10 AN EFFECTIVE TREATMENT FOR MALE FERTILITY

A total of 228 men with unexplained infertility were given either placebo (n=114) or 200mg ubiquinol (a form of coenzyme Q10) daily for 26 weeks. At the end of the treatment period, sperm density was 70% higher in the CoQ10 group, sperm motility was 40% higher, and sperm structure was 19% better.  They also found treatment duration correlated with healthy sperm parmeters so that the longer the men were on CoQ10, the better the improvement in their sperm count, function and motility.

(Journal of Urology, August 2012)
LINK to ABSTRACT Effects of the reduced form of coenzyme q(10) (ubiquinol) on semen parameters in men with idiopathic infertility: a double-blind, placebo controlled, randomized study.

 

 

 

CLINICAL UPDATE - VITAMIN C AND E REDUCE DAMAGE CAUSED BY ORAL CONTRACEPTIVES

When a group of women who were taking oral contraceptives were compared to a similar group taking oral contraceptives with vitamin C and E, the data showed that antioxidant enzyme activity was increased in the supplemented group.  Markers of oxidative stress were also reduced in the supplement group as well as a similar group of women who were not taking birth control pills or supplements (control group). The authors concluded that low dose birth control pills increase oxidative stress (specifically lipid peroxidation) and that supplements may alleviate this damage.

(Contraception, July 2012)

LINK to ABSTRACTEffect of vitamin E and C supplements on lipid peroxidation and GSH-dependent antioxidant enzyme status in the blood of women consuming oral contraceptives.

ish-oil supplementation enhances the effects of strength training in elderly women.