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June 2012 - Volume 6, Issue 6

 

In this issue...

-   B vitamins reduce work stress

-   N-acetyl cysteine lowers risk of atrial fibrillation

-   CoQ10 improves symptoms of fibromyalgia

-   Carotenoid status linked to estrogen related breast cancers

-   Lipoic acid helps diabetics control blood sugar and minimize complications

-   In some people, HDL doesn’t lower heart disease risk as much as previously thought

-   Conventional wisdom that a fetus always pulls nutrients it needs from mother is challenged

 

                                                                                                                                                 

 

 

 

CLINICAL UPDATE - B VITAMINS REDUCE WORK STRESS

In this double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial, sixty people were given either placebo or a high dose B complex vitamin for 90 days.  When all work-related factors were statistically controlled, those taking the high dose B complex reported “significant decreases in the experience of workplace stress.”  Specifically they reported “lower personal strain and a reduction in confusion and depressed/dejected mood,” leading authors of the study to conclude that B vitamin supplements  are an inexpensive way to  potentially reduce occupational stress.

(Human Psychopharmacology, October 2011)

LINK to ABSTRACT  The effect of 90 day administration of a high dose vitamin B-complex on work stress.

 

 

 

CLINICAL UPDATE - n-ACETYL CYSTEINE LOWERS RISK OF ATRIAL FIBRILLATION

Evidence supports the theory that oxidative stress plays a major role in the cause of atrial fibrillation – the uncontrolled quivering of heart muscle that is often fatal, and which commonly occurs after heart surgery.  After a review of eight trials, authors stated that the antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine significantly reduced the incidence of post-operative atrial fibrillation, although the length of hospital stay was not reduced.

(BMC Cardiovascular Disorders, February 2012)

LINK to ABSTRACT N-acetyl cysteine supplementation for the prevention of atrial fibrillation after cardiac surger: a meta-analysis of eight randomized controlled trials.

LINK to FREE FULL TEXT

 

 

 

 

 

CLINICAL UPDATE - CQ10 IMPROVES SYMPTOMS OF FIBROMYALGIA

The role of coenzyme q10 in mitochondrial function may explain the clinical result of co10 supplementation on fibromyalgia patients.  Oral supplementation of 300mg of coQ10 for three months restored CoQ10 levels in blood on fibromyalgia patients while reducing clinical symptoms of the disease such as muscle pain and fatigue.

(Clinical Biochemistry, April 2012)

LINK to ABSTRACT Coenzyme Q10 in salivary cells correlate with blood cells in Fibromyalgia: improvement in clinical and biochemical parameter after oral treatment.

LINK to FLYER on NUTRIENT INTERACTIONS OF FIBROMYALGIA

 

 

CLINICAL UPDATE - CAROTENOID STATUS LINKED TO ESTROGEN RELATED BREAST CANCERS

Intake of the following carotenoids was evaluated on over one million women: α-carotene, β-carotene, lutein and zeaxanthin. Researchers found that intake of the above carotenoids were inversely associated with estrogen receptor negative breast cancers.

(Ameican Journal of Clinical Nutrition, March 2012)

LINK to ABSTRACT Carotenoid intakes and risk of breast cancer defined by estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor status: a pooled analysis of 18 prospective cohort studies.

 

 

 

 

CLINICAL UPDATE - LIPOIC ACID HELPS DIABETICS CONTROL BLOOD SUGAR AND MINIMIZE COMPLICATIONS

Taking lipoic acid supplements reduced fasting blood glucose and HbA1c in a dose dependent manner on a group of 38 type II diabetics. Dosages of 300, 600, 900 and 1200 mg/day of alpha-lipoic acid were given for six months while measures of blood sugar control were taken.  Markers of oxidative stress, which usually exacerbates diabetic complications, were also lower in the treated patients.  These results mimic a recent animal study where lipoic acid positively altered the expression of genes that regulate antioxidant defense systems, and in doing so, reduced diet-induced oxidative stress.

(Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 2012)
(Nutrition, March 2012)

LINK to ABSTRACT Glycemic and oxidative status of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus following oral administration of alpha-lipoic acid: a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial.

LINK to ABSTRACT Lipoic acid attenuates high-fat-diet-induced oxidative stress and B-cell-related immune depression

 

 

 

CLINICAL UPDATE - IN SOME PEOPLE, HDL DOESN'T LOWER HEART DISEASE RISK AS MUCH AS PREVIOUSLY THOUGHT

When the HDL levels of over 100,000 people were evaluated, about 2-6% of the people studied had a specific gene that raised their HDL cholesterol significantly.  However, the rates of heart attack were not lower in this group, even though they had an HDL level that would normally lower their risk of heart attack.  Researchers concluded that for people carrying a specific gene (called the endothelial lipase gene), an increase in HDL cholesterol does not given them the heart disease protection that HDL would give those without this gene.   In short, HDL cholesterol doesn’t reduce risk in everyone equally 

(Lancet, May 2012)

LINK to ABSTRACT Plasma HDL cholesterol and risk of myocardial infarction: a mendelian randomisation study.





CLINICAL UPDATE - CONVENTIONAL WISDOM THAT A FETUS ALWAYS PULLS NUTRIENTS IT NEEDS FROM MOTHER IS CHALLENGED

A recent study on 258 healthy pregnant women and the umbilical cord blood of their babies showed that when the mother is deficient in vitamin D, her baby will be deficient as well.  This is very different from the common misconception that the fetus will sequester whatever nutrients it needs, at the expense of the mother.  At least with vitamin D, mother and baby have very similar levels in their blood.  In other words, if the mother is deficient, the baby is deficient.  In another study, vitamin D deficiency during pregnancy was associated with impaired language ability of the child at 5 and 10 years of age.

(Pediatric and Perinatal Epidemiology, January 2012)

(Pediatrics, March 2012)

LINK to ABSTRACT Vitamin D deficiency in pregnant women and their neonates in spring time in western Turkey.

LINK to ABSTRACT Maternal serum vitamin D levels during pregnancy and offspring neurocognitive development.