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February 2012 - Volume 6, Issue 2

 

In this issue...

- Adding carnitine to drug therapy improves clinical benefit in diabetes, colitis and hepatitis

- Chromium supplements improve insulin sensitivity in randomized trial

- Calcium and vitamin D shown to reduce abdominal fat in clinical trial

- Multivitamins to improve health gain credibility

- Raising antioxidant status in pregnancy lowers chance of allergies in offspring

- Oleic acid levels predict insulin resistance

                                                                                                                                                 

 

 

 

CLINICAL UPDATE - ADDING CARNITINE TO DRUG THERAPY IMPROVES CLINICAL BENEFIT IN DIABETES, COLITIS AND HEPATITIS

Three unrelated trials all demonstrated that carnitine, which transports fatty acids into the mitochondria, improved clinical outcomes when it was added to drug therapy, when compared to drug therapy alone.  Dosages ranged from 1-2 grams per day in the trials.  Specifically, diabetics on orlistat therapy showed improvements in sugar and lipid metabolism and lower inflammation when 2grams per day of carnitine was added to their orlistat.  Similarly, carnitine reduced fatigue in hepatitis patients on anti-viral drugs.  Finally, adding 1 gram per day of carnitine lowers colitis remission rates on patients taking antibiotics.

(Fundamental and Clinical Pharmacology, October 2011)

(Journal of Interferon and Cytokine Research, September 2011)

(Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics, November 2011)

LINK to ABSTRACT Comparison between orlistat plus l-carnitine and orlistat alone on inflammation parameters in obese diabetic patients.

LINK to ABSTRACT The supplementation of acetyl-L-carnitine decreases fatigue and increases quality of life in patients with hepatitis C treated with pegylated interferon-α 2b plus ribavirin.

LINK to ABSTRACT Randomised clinical trial: the efficacy and safety of propionyl-L-carnitine therapy in patients with ulcerative colitis receiving stable oral treatment.

 

 

 

 

 

CLINICAL UPDATE - CHROMIUM SUPPLEMENTS IMPROVE INSULIN SENSITIVITY IN RANDOMIZED TRIAL

In this small randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial on overweight children aged 9-12 years old, 400μg of chromium chloride given for 6 weeks improved insulin sensitivity and raised lean body mass while lowering their percentage of body fat.

(Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry, November 2011)

LINK to ABSTRACT Effects of short-term chromium supplementation on insulin sensitivity and body composition in overweight children: randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study.

 

 

 

 

CLINICAL UPDATE - CALCIUM AND VITAMIN D SHOWN TO REDUCE ABDOMINAL FAT IN CLINICAL TRIAL

Two double-blind, placebo-controlled trials were conducted in which 171 people were given either orange juice fortified with 350mg of calcium and 100IU of vitamin D or non-fortified orange juice.  After four months, the average weight loss in both groups was the same – about 5 ½ pounds – but scans revealed that in the group supplemented with calcium and vitamin D, the loss of visceral (abdominal) fat was significantly greater than the loss of subcutaneous fat.

(American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, January 2012)

LINK to ABSTRACT Calcium and vitamin D supplementation is associated with decreased abdominal visceral adipose tissue in overweight and obese adults.

 

 

 

 

CLINICAL UPDATE - MULTIVITAMINS TO IMPROVE HEALTH GAIN CREDIBILITY

Two studies – one long term (6 years) and one short term (1 month) – demonstrated that multivitamin usage improved cognitive and physical performance in healthy adults.  The first study included over 4400 people ages 45-60 years old and measured cognitive performance, which improved when compared to placebo when participants took a multivitamin with vitamins A,C and E combined with selenium and zinc.  The second study was much smaller – only 31 participants, all healthy – but demonstrated that short term administration of a multivitamin reduced inflammatory markers such as interleukin-6 while improving measures of physical performance associated with exercise.

(American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, September 2011)

(Nutrition Journal, September 2011)

LINK to ABSTRACT French adults' cognitive performance after daily supplementation with antioxidant vitamins and minerals at nutritional doses: a post hoc analysis of the Supplementation in Vitamins and Mineral Antioxidants (SU.VI.MAX) trial.

LINK to ABSTRACT A multi-nutrient supplement reduced markers of inflammation and improved physical performance in active individuals of middle to older age: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study.  LINK to FREE FULL TEXT

 

 

 

 

 

CLINICAL UPDATE - RAISING ANTIOXIDANT STATUS IN PREGNANCY LOWERS CHANCE OF ALLERGIES IN OFFSPRING

In this review of 18 studies, the authors concluded that higher antioxidant status during pregnancy reduced the likelihood of allergic symptoms in children including asthma, wheezing and eczema.

(Nutrition Reviews, November 2011)

LINK to ABSTRACT Association between biomarker-quantified antioxidant status during pregnancy and infancy and allergic disease during early childhood: a systematic review. 

 

 

 

 

CLINICAL UPDATE - OLEIC ACID LEVELS PREDICT INSULIN RESISTANCE

A group of 361 non-diabetic men and women were evaluated for insulin resistance.  The same group’s blood was measured for specific fatty acid content.   In this group (where one fourth were clinically insulin resistant), only levels of oleic acid, commonly found in olive oil, was a significant predictor of insulin resistance, compared with other fatty acids.

(Clinical Nutrition, October 2011)

LINK to ABSTRACT Inverse association between serum phospholipid oleic acid and insulin resistance in subjects with primary dyslipidaemia.