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February 2011 - Volume 5, Issue 02

 

In this issue...

- DHA increases LDL particle size

- Anti-psychotic drugs change omega 3 index in schizophrenics

- Scientists find root cause of declining health in old age

- Higher levels of vitamin D are not necessarily better

- Food/ mineral supplement recommended by pediatricians in ADHD study

- Vitamin C may be an independent predictor of homocysteine

 


                                                                                                                                                 

 

 

 

CLINICAL UPDATE - DHA increases Ldl particle size

Thirty-six overweight adults were treated with 2 grams of the omega 3 fatty acid DHA (docosahexaenoic acid) daily for four and a half months.  In the DHA group, LDL particle size increased and triglycerides decreased compared to the placebo group, both beneficial changes that lower cardiovascular risk.

(Journal of Nutrition, February 2011)

Link to ABSTRACT: Algal docosahexaenoic Acid affects plasma lipoprotein particle size distribution in overweight and obese adults.

 

 

 

 

 

CLINICAL UPDATE - anti-psychotic drugs change omega 3 index in schizophrenics

Red blood cell fatty acids (omega 3 index) were measured in 36 patients diagnosed with schizophrenia and compared to 36 control patients.  Before treatment with anti-psychotic drugs, DHA and AA (arachidonic acid) was lower and the omega 6:omega 3 ratio was higher in schizophrenics but after three months on anti-psychotic treatment, levels of polyunsaturated fats along with a reduction in symptoms occurred that was comparable to controls.

(Prostaglandins, Leukotrienes and Essential Fatty Acids, September 2010)

Link to ABSTRACT: Polyunsaturated fatty acids deficits are associated with psychotic state and negative symptoms in patients with schizophrenia.

 

 

 

 

 

Clinical Update - scientists find root cause of declining health in old age

Scientists found that the basic cause of age-related health decline is malfunctioning telomeres.  The study was performed in mice, but the principles broadly apply to mammalian systems.

(Nature, February 2011)

LINK to NEWS SUMMARY

LINK to ABSTRACT Telomere dysfunction induces metabolic and mitochondrial compromise

 

 

 

 

 

Clinical update - Higher levels of vitamin D are not necessarily better

Levels of vitamin D were monitored in about 1200 elderly men for over 12 years and researchers found a U-shaped association between vitamin D and both cancer and total mortality.  In other words, men with the lowest (<46nmol/L) and men with the highest (>98nmol/L) levels of plasma vitamin D had a higher death rate than men with intermediate levels, further supporting the notion that “more is not always better” when it comes to nutrient levels.

(American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, October 2010)

Link to ABSTRACT: Plasma vitamin D and mortality in older men: a community-based   prospective cohort study.


 

 

 

 

Clinical update - Food/ mineral supplement recommended by pediatricians in adhd study

In a large observational study, a supplement containing omega 6 and omega 3 fatty acids, magnesium and zinc was prescribed to 810 children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. After 12 weeks of supplementation, standardized testing showed improvement in impulsivity and fewer emotional problems and sleeping disorders that are commonly associated with ADHD.  Pediatricians recommended continued  supplementation for 61% of the children
              (Lipids in Health and Disease, September 2010)

Link to ABSTRACT: Supplementation of polyunsaturated fatty acids, magnesium and zinc in children seeking medical advice for attention-deficit/hyperactivity problems – an observational cohort study.

Link to FREE FULL TEXT

 

 

 

 

Clinical update - vitamin c may be an independent predictor of homocysteine

Intake, plasma and supplementation levels of three antioxidants – vitamins B, C and E – were compared to homocysteine levels on 184 elderly men and women.  Only plasma vitamin C was associated with lower homocysteine, although intake and supplementation levels of vitamin C were not.

(Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism, Novmeber 2010)

Link to ABSTRACT:  Effect of Antioxidant Vitamins on the Plasma Homocysteine Level in a Free-Living Elderly Population.