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December 2008 - Volume 2, Issue 12

In this issue...

- Vitamin D may protect against placental infection

- Aspirin did not reduce heart disease risk in diabetics

- Plasma choline not an accurate measure of choline status

- Selenium supplements may boost heart health

- Vitamin E inhibits fat cell formation

- Biotin deficiency a common problem in pregnancy


                                                                                                                                                 

 

 

 

CLINICAL UPDATE - vitamin d may protect against placental infection

Supplementating the diet of pregnant women iwith vitamin D may enhance the placental innate immunity and protect it from infection, according to new study

(Biology of Reproduction, November 2008)

Link to FULL STORY

Link to ABSTRACT Vitamin D induces innate antibacterial responses in human trophoblasts via an intracrine pathway.

Link to FULL PAPER

 

 

 

CLINICAL UPDATE - aspirin did not reduce heart disease risk in diabetics

Low-dose aspirin therapy did not reduce the risk of cardiovascular events in a group of over 2500 diabetic patients that were monitored in a randomized controlled trial

(Journal of the American Medical Association, November 2008)

Link to ABSTRACT Low-dose aspirin for primary prevention of atherosclerotic events in patients with type 2 diabetes: a randomized controlled trial.

 

 

 

CLINICAL UPDATE - Plasma choline not an accurate measure of choline status

Conventional blood indicators of choline did not change in response to a 14-week controlled feeding study that increased intake of choline and betaine, indicating a functional measure of choline may be more accurate than plasma levels

(Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry, January 2009)

Link to ABSTRACT Choline status is not a reliable indicator of moderate changes in dietary choline consumption in premenopausal women.

 

 

 

CLINICAL UPDATE - Selenium supplements may boost heart health

Supplements of selenium may increase levels of an antioxidant enzyme with a reported role in cardiovascular prevention, according to new study

(American Heart Journal, December 2008)

Link to FULL STORY

Link to ABSTRACT Selenium supplementation improves antioxidant capacity in vitro and in vivo in patients with coronary artery disease. The Selenium Therapy in Coronary Artery disease Patients (SETCAP) Study.

 

 

 

CLINICAL UPDATE - vitamin inhibits fat cell formation

In vivo animal studies suggest that a form of vitamin E (tocotrienol) thwarts insulin-induced differntiation of pre-fat cells into mature fat cells, resulting in a decrease in body fat

(Journal of Nutrition, January 2009)

Link to ABSTRACT Tocotrienol suppresses adipocyte differentiation and Akt Phosphorylation in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes.

 

 

 

CLINICAL UPDATE - biotin deficiency a common problem in pregnancy

Like other nutrients, biotin requirements during pregnancy increase and should be addressed since biotin deficiency during pregnancy may cause birth defects

(Journal of Nutrition, January 2009)

(Nutrition, January 2009)

Link to ABSTRACT Marginal biotin deficiency is common in normal human pregnancy and is highly teratogenic in mice.

Link to ABSTRACT Effects of biotin deficiency on embryonic development in mice.