The Role of vitamin E

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The Role of vitamin E

Vitamin E

Vitamin E is an antioxidant that protects cell membranes and other fat-soluble compounds from oxidative damage by free radicals.

Vitamin E exists in eight chemical forms (alpha-, beta-, gamma-, and delta-tocopherol and alpha-, beta-, gamma-, and delta-tocotrienol) that have varying levels of biological activity. Alpha- (or α-) tocopherol is the only form that is recognized to meet human requirements. Alpha-tocopherol has direct effect on the control of inflammation, red and white blood cell production, connective tissue growth and genetic control of cell division.  Vitamin E acts to reduce free radical damage. 

The principal use of vitamin E is that of an antioxidant.  It helps protects against heart disease, cancer, stroke and neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's.  In addition, alpha-tocopherol supplementation is useful in treating other cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, fibrocystic breast disease, menopause symptoms and tardive dyskinesia.  It may also have applications in Parkinson's Disease and arthritis.  Vitamin E is important to immune function, protecting thymic function and white blood cells from oxidative stress.

Symptoms of vitamin E Deficiency:

  • Nerve damage
  • Muscle weakness
  • Poor coordination
  • Involuntary eye movements
  • Red blood cell fragility 
  • Anemia
  • Retrolental fibroplasia 


Download your very own copy of the Nutrient Deficiency Chart and the Cognitive Function Sheet.

To find out your micronutrients levels, click here

 

Posted by Elissa Rodriguez at 12:00 AM